London’s 3DPrinting Trade Show >

Some of 3DPrinting’s possibilities will be on display at the UK’s first 3DPrinting trade show from Friday to next Sunday at The Brewery in central London . Clothes made using the technique will be exhibited in a live fashion show, which will include the unveiling of a hat designed for the event by the milliner Stephen Jones, and a band playing a specially composed score on 3DPrinted musical instruments.

3DPrinting is Star Trek science made reality, with the potential for production-line replacement body parts, aeronautical spares, fashion, furniture and virtually any other object on demand.

The cutting-edge technology, which layers plastic resin in a manner similar to an inkjet printer to create 3D objects, is on its way to becoming affordable for home use.

Some 2,000 consumers are expected to join 1,000 people from the burgeoning industry to see what the technique has to offer, including jewellery and art.

A 3D body scanner, which can reproduce a “mini” version of the person scanned, will also be on display. Workshops run by Jason Lopes of Legacy Effects, which provided 3DPrinted models and props for cinema blockbusters such as the Iron Man series and Snow White and the Huntsman, will add a sprinkling of Hollywood glamour. Kerry Hogarth, the woman behind 3DPrintshow, said yesterday she aims to showcase the potential of the technology for families.

Prices for printers start at around £1,o00 – DIY kits from around £500 – they will continue to drop steadily over the coming year.

Birmingham-based Black Country Atelier, will invite people to design a model vehicle and then see the result “printed” off for them to take home.

“We believe 3DPrinting needs to be seen to be believed,” Ms Hogarth said. “We hope that our show will give fashion students, makers, designers, artists, families and businesses the chance to see the different types of services, software and print technology available to them.”

3D Printshow runs from 19-21 October (3dprintshow.com)

NEW MATERIALS: Viscous Liquids & Flexible Solids >

Viscous Liquids

 

Recently TNO researchers have developed a print head that can handle viscous liquids. This allows computer controlled 3D printer to work with stronger objects.

Currently DIY 3D printers can build complex objects by extruding tiny droplets of liquid plastic through extruder but the printed objects are often not strong enough. To be able to print with a conventional print head, the material must be thin liquid and that means the monomers (long molecular chains, the building blocks of a plastic) is short.

“After curing the product is often brittle and fragile,” says Dr. René Houben of the Department Equipment for Additive Manufacturing of TNO.

To solve this problem Houben designed an entirely new print head, suitable for a mixture with much longer chains. The maximum workable viscosity is around 500 mPas (millipascal seconds, the unit of viscosity), similar to thick motor oil.

Houben presented his work at the end of September at the University of Twente.

Most home color printers work with “drop on demand” method: nozzle spits out ink exactly when required. For viscous liquids it does not work like that. For pressing “ink” through the nozzle you need a high pressure of a couple of hundred bar.

Houten made a so-called continuous inkjet to create a continuous stream of droplets. Once in motion only a much lower pressure is needed. The basis of the print head is a metal cylinder with a nozzle of 80 microns in diameter.

Inside the head, just above the nozzle, there is a cylinder with a piezoelectric crystal vibrating at 20 kHz and an amplitude of about 100 nm to ensure a stable flow of liquid.

The liquid is set to vibration and it breaks just below the nozzle at some twenty thousand identical droplets with a diameter of about 140 µm, with a speed of approximately 10 m/s.

In this printing system selective passage of droplets is essential – otherwise it would only be a flat printing. Existing continuous printing usually give droplets a small electric charge and bend them in the direction of a discharge chute. Most plastics, however, are non-conductive.

 

“It is possible to add conductive materials, but this changes the composition, which is usually undesirable. Think of materials for medical implants or displays, in which the material composition is very close, “says Houben.

 

He found an unusual solution: a fine stream of air from a syringe shoots unwanted droplets away. It sounds easy, but the on and off of an air flow of 20 kHz was not feasible.

Therefore TNO researchers developed a fine mechanical system with a continuous airflow – to set the droplet stream within 20 µs and can only shoot single drop out.

“We believe this is the way to get the fastest building speed. We strive to minimize the time that a print head does nothing”, says Houben.

A plastic block that is printed in layers by three heads in three colors: blue, red and transparent plastic. Photo: TNO

Besides 3D printing of relatively strong plastics, the print head has an unexpected application: making milk powder. Milk drops can be rapidly turned into powder by using spray drying in high spray towers.

Source: deingenieur
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Flexible Solids

Fabbster uploaded a video of 3D prints of flexible material made on a Fabbster 3D printer. Fabbster uses a special material concept: SDM – stick deposition moulding.

The extruder of the printer is fed with special sticks developed by the fabbster team. These sticks are characterized by a cogging-shape on their sides. They are made by injection molding technique and thus are extremely precise. This innovation offers some major advantage over circular filament that is subject to slip.

The sticks are automatically fed to the extruder via a supply magazine. The result is a precise dosage of the melt. Also they can be easily combined to produce an object in various colors and materials.

^In this video, Fabbster showed objects printed using sticks made of flexible material and compared the print with ABS plastic print

Source: Fabbster

 

3DPrinting an EU Industrial Revival? >

  • EU paper promotes new tech to boost GDP from 16% to 20% of EU GDP by 2020
  • Manufacturing job losses 3 million since crisis
  • Advanced manufacturing markets to double by 2015

The decline in the European Union’s manufacturing is the center of the sights for The European Commission’s leaked paper seek by Reuters  asking countries to invest heavily in new technologies such as 3DPrinting.

The European Union’s main regulators are aiming to ensure that new technologies are exploited to cheapen manufacturing costs and increase production to combat the trends for diminishing output of the key manufacturing industries in Europe.

The paper, which outlines the bloc’s future industrial policy, said the commission wants to raise manufacturing from 16 percent to 20 percent of EU GDP by 2020 using new techniques such as 3DPrinting – the technology that enthusiasts calculate will revolutionise manufacturing, including electronics such as mobile phones, and save millions in costs.

The Commission also wants countries to invest heavily in advanced technologies such as industrial biotechnology – which uses living cells to make materials such as chemicals, detergents and paper.

The market for such technologies is tipped to grow by 50 percent from 646 billion euros to more than 1 trillion euros by 2015, the paper said.

Industrial production has declined 10 percent since the crisis and more than 3 million industrial jobs have been lost.

The car industry is among the hardest hit, with large over capacity in mid-market car makers in France, Spain and Italy: Total European car sales fell 6.6 percent in the period from January to August this year.

The paper indicates that the European Union has not exploited past emerging industries such as rechargeable lithium batteries. It says European firms hold more than 30 percent of the relevant patents “without any production of such batteries taking place in the EU”.

To reverse such trends the Commission proposes non-binding targets for manufacturing and investment, both public and private.

The European commissioner in charge of industrial policy Antonio Tajani (see profile link below) will launch the new proposals on Wednesday.

The policy will also promote green vehicles, smart grids, sustainable construction materials, and so-called key enabling technologies which include nanotechnology and photonics.’

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FOCUS: PERSON

Antonio TAJANI – European commissioner in charge of industrial policy

 

Born on 4 August 1953, Roma, Italy

  

Curriculum vitae (The MEP is solely responsible for the information published)

 

  • Graduate in law (La Sapienza University of Rome). Editor of ‘Il Settimanale’ (1982); presenter of Radio 1 news programme (1982); head of the Rome editorial office of the newspaper ‘Il Giornale’ (1983).
  • Spokesman for the Prime Minister (1994). Vice-chairman of the European People’s Party. Member of Rome City Council (since June 2001).
  • Member of the European Parliament (since 1994). Head of the Forza Italia delegation in the European Parliament.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meps/en/2187/ANTONIO_TAJANI.html

 

More: 

http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/futurium/future/personalized-manufacturing-3d-printing-and-more
http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/10/08/eu-industrialpolicy-idINL6E8L8NYP20121008
http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/breaking-news/world/eu-sees-industrial-revival-through-3d-printing-and-biotech-20121009

Water Cooled RepRap > > >

Adrian Bowyer, inventor of the world’s most popular home 3DPrinter genus, the RepRap, has been experimenting with a water-cooled print head.

Whilst the fan-cooled heads are a highly successful design, having a very short melt zone and high-power to respond to changes in load, the fan is often deemed relatively bulky.

The application of water cooling, which has emerged as a subtle but growing trend in the home computing world, has an outcome much lighter and more compact.

Best of all the cooling is more efficient.

A brass block that replaces the normal aluminium cooling block that attaches to the fan.  The brass has water channels drilled in it, and some soft silicone tubing connecting it to a small 12V gear pump.  The inflow and outflow temperatures are only a fraction of a degree different, meaning that multiple heads could be chained in series and all cooled by the same flow.

Here is a video from the inventor’s labs to whet your intrigue…

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/45756426″>RepRap water-cooled head</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user403878″>Adrian Bowyer</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

More: http://reprappro.com/Special_Blog?cmd=post&id=6

U.S. Air Force: AD2035 > > >

(Credit: USAF)ARTICLE SPECIALIST KNOWLEDGE LEVEL > >2> > >

Exhilarating and fast-paced, this following video on ever accelerating change by the U.S. Air Force, named ‘Welcome to 2035…the Age of Surprise,’ references 3DPrinting among many other amazing developing and future technological shifts in materials, manufacturing,  cyberspace and aerospace. The Air University‘s U.S. Air Force Center for Strategy and Technology based the on Blue Horizons, a multiple year future study being conducted for the Air Force Chief of Staff: “We can predict broad outlines, but we don’t know the ramifications,” the video suggests “the collective intelligence of humanity drives innovation in every direction while enabling new threats from super-empowered individuals with new domains, interconnecting faster than ever before. Unlimited combinations create unforeseen consequences…”

Blue Horizons: air, space, and cyberspace in 20 years

Air Force 2025, the previous major internal study of the future, was produced at Air University in 1996. Over 260 officers worked through the research that led to a large report outlining alternative futures and technologies required for those complex worlds. The Blue Horizons study is designed to answer questions similar to those addressed in the Air Force 2025 study. These include:

 

  • What are the emerging technologies that will shape the US Air Force and the conflict arena in which it must operate in 20 years in the future?
  • What could air, space and cyberspace power look like 20 years in the future?
  • Who will have access to emerging technologies that can make a difference?
  • How soon will these important technological achievements become fielded systems?


The students researched future systems and technological concepts working closely with subject matter experts from the Air Force Research Laboratory, the Defense Research Projects Agency, major universities and businesses, and other government laboratories and agencies. In addition to producing the reports posted here, the result was a cadre of officers conversant enough in critical areas of emerging technologies to ask critical questions and make assessments of systems in directed energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology and cyber technologies and what they mean for the future of the U.S. Air Force. Blue Horizons 2007 was only the beginning of a series of annual long range vision studies which are known collectively as “Blue Horizons.”  These annual studies serve as an input for the development of Title X wargames
, Strategic Planning Guidance, Quadrennial Defense Review scenarios and the development of service requirements. Here’s that amazing video:

Adapted from: http://www.kurzweilai.net/welcome-to-2035-the-age-of-surprise  (September 10, 2012 by Amara D. Angelica, editor of KurzweilAI.)